How to get 10046 Trace for Oracle Export and Import Utility

PURPOSE
——-

If you want to find out what happens when you run Oracle export or Oracle import utility is to set ON the Oracle trace event 10046. This will generate a trace file that can be used to find out the actual happenings behind the scene.

This is how you can get 10046 Trace for Export and Import Utilities

1] Run the Oracle export command export and let the program prompt you for the options.

$ exp

Enter user and password as below when prompted
Username: system
Password:

2] Open another window to the database server and login using sqlplus.

$ sqlplus system/manager

3] Now find out the SID of exp session

sql> select sid,program from
v$session where username = ‘SYSTEM’;

SID PROGRAM
———- ————————————————
788 exp@SERVER01 (TNS V1-V3)

4] Now find the PID and SPID for that session

sql> select s.sid, p.pid, p.spid
from v$session s, v$process p
where s.paddr = p.addr and s.sid = 10;

SID PID SPID
———- ———- ———
788 189 1076

SPID from the previous query is equivalent to OSPID (operating System process). This is the process that will be traced

5] Now exit from this session

Sql>exit

6] Generate a trace file for Procces ID 1076. To do that login as sys using sqlplus and run the commands (in bold)

$ sqlplus / as sysdba

SQL> oradebug setospid 1076
Oracle pid: 189, Unix process pid: 1076, image: oracle@SERVER01 (TNS V1-V3)

SQL> oradebug unlimit
Statement processed.

SQL> oradebug tracefile_name
/u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/dev/DEV1/trace/DEV1_ora_1076.trc

This gives the name of the trace file

SQL> oradebug Event 10046 trace name context forever, level 12;
Statement processed.

7] From the window where “exp” command was run, now export a table

8] From the SQL prompt of the window where logged in as “sys” user
Set the Trace off once you get the Required information or the error.

SQL> oradebug Event 10046 trace name context off;
ORA-00072: process “Unix process pid: 17370, image: oracle@ SERVER01″ is not active

SQL>exit

Now you have got the trace file which is
/u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/dev/DEV1/trace/DEV1_ora_1076.trc

Top 5 Password Managers for Linux [Guest Post]

In this post you will find set of password managers for Linux which provides secure storage for your passwords for sensitive data. If you still keep the passwords in plain text then you must consider one of available password managers so this article is for you.

KeePassX

KeePassX has been a very popular and famous password manager for Linux for a very long time and still trusted by pretty big number of users. When user launches the KeePassX password manager first it requires to set up of a master password to add an extra layer of security to password storage. As an option you can use a file with encryption key instead of the password. This key file can be used along with the master password to provide stronger security. KeePassX application is rather simple so you can easily create one or more databases which will have a master password and will contain all the login credentials stored encrypted. This manager is considered to be one of the most secure managers. If you’re Ubuntu user just type in terminal the following command:

sudo apt-get install keepassx

GPassword Manager

Gpassword Manager (GPM) is also one of the most secure and highly rated password managers which have more friendly and easy to use interface that KeePassX. This utility has many features that make it to be a good choice for most of the high level computer users. This password manager allows to set and add favorites into system-tray that is one of the unique features of this application. GPM utility uses the crypto++ method for encryption which can be used in Windows and Linux hence it enables the same database to be used on different platforms without the need to convert anything.

My Passwords

My Passwords is a simple and easy to use utility that allows you to store all your login credentials in an encrypted manner within a file. The most exciting feature of this utility are its speed and no requirement of an installation. Encryption algorithm that is used there is AES. Storage in Derby Database format along with AES encryption gives the user the power to create secure and fast password repository. The interface for this utility is fairly simple.

Fiagaro’s Password Manager 2

Fiagaro’s Password Manager 2 is another powerful tool with strong encryption methods that makes it one of the most secure utility for managing passwords in Linux. Fiagaro’s Password Manager 2 uses the AES-256 encryption of the database files which hold all your login credentials (it uses master password that should be set up once you started the program first).

Gringotts

Gringotts is rather old project: its application for Linux/Unix provides the user the possibility to store his or her notes in secure storage encrypted by symmetrical ciphers. Gringotts has a set of eight different algorithms that can be used to encrypt the desired data. This utility also provides different methods for hashing as well as compression. The interface of Gringotts is not as simple as of other password Managers but still easy to use and most effective for old school bearded Unix users.

About the author: Kelly Marsh is a blogger by profession. She loves writing on technology and luxury. Beside this she is fond of technology. Recently an article on Maruti Ritz attracted her attention. These days she is busy in writing an article on johnnie walker blue.

Why Mosh is better than SSH?

Mosh screenshot

Mosh (stands for Mobile Shell) is replacement of SSH for remote connections to Unix/Linux systems. It brings a few noticeable advantages over well known SSH connections. In brief, it’s faster and more responsive, especially on long delay and/or unreliable links.

Key benefits of Mosh

  • Stays connected if your IP is changed. Roaming feature of Mosh allows you to move between Internet connections and keep Mosh session online. For example, if your wifi connection changes IP you don’t need to reconnect.
  • Keeps session after loosing connection. For example, if you lost Internet connection for some time, or your laptop went offline due to exhausted battery – you’ll be able to pick up previously opened Mosh session easily.
  • No root rights needed to use Mosh. Unlike SSH Mosh server is not a daemon that needs to listen on specific port to accept incoming connections from clients. Mosh server and client are executables that could be run by ordinary user.
  • The same credentials for remote login. Mosh uses SSH for authorization so in order to open connection you need the same credentials as before.
  • Responsive Ctrl+C combination. Unlike SSH Mosh doesn’t fill up network buffers so even if you accidentally requested to output 100 MB file you’ll be able to hit Ctrl+C and stop it immediately.
  • Better for slow or lagged links. Have you ever tried to use SSH on satellite link where average RTT is 600 ms or more? Wish Mosh you don’t need to wait until server replies to see your typing. It works in CLI and such programs as vi or emacs so on it makes it possible to do the job slow connections more comfortably.

Well, there are some disadvantages too:

  • No IPv6 support.
  • UTF-8 only.

Mosh is available for all major Linux distributions, FreeBSD and Mac OS X systems:

Ubuntu (12.04 LTS) or Debian (testing/unstable):

sudo apt-get install mosh

Gentoo:

emerge net-misc/mosh

Arch Linux:

packer -S mobile-shell-git

FreeBSD:

portmaster net/mosh

Mac OS X:

<a  class="colorbox" href="https://github.com/downloads/keithw/mosh/mosh-1.1.3-2.pkg">mosh-1.1.3-2.pkg</a>

Sources: mosh-1.1.3.tar.gz

Project’s website

P.S. It’s better that combination of SSH and GNU Screen.